Étiqueté : United Kingdom

Shale gas in the United Kingdom

There have been several parliamentary inquiries into shale gas operations in the United Kingdom. The House of Commons Select Committee most recently reported in April 2013. In June 2013, the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee announced that it was launching its own inquiry into UK shale gas operations, inviting answers to a series of questions…

Biofuels – At what cost? A review of costs and benefits of U.K. biofuel policies

« This IISD report evaluates some of the principal issues associated with the U.K.’s biofuel industry, including support policies, employment creation, emissions abatement, and the role of biofuels and other renewable technologies in meeting EU renewable energy targets… »

UK Shale Gas – Hype, Reality and Difficult Questions

The shale gas phenomenon has transformed the US from prospective LNG importer to the current expectation of it becoming a major LNG exporter. In the UK the recent upgraded estimates by the British Geological Society of shale gas resources in the north of England have unleashed a wave of speculation in the media which includes an anticipation of lower prices and eliminating the need for natural gas imports…

Global trends in Electricity Transmission System Operation: Where does the future lie?

Unbundling of the Electricity Supply Industry (ESI) has resulted in establishment of different arrangements of electricity transmission system operation. While there is a significant move away from the traditional vertically integrated utility arrangement, it remains to be seen which one arrangement will evolve as a global winner. (© EPRG)

What the United States and the United Kingdom can teach each other about climate change and sustainable development at the national level

As the urgency of climate change, biodiversity loss, severe poverty, and other global environmental and development challenges continues to grow, concerted international action to address them is becoming even harder. National efforts are thus more important than ever. An important example is the United Kingdom and the United States, which have stronger ties with each other than almost any other county — the so-called “special relationship

Low carbon nation?

What does the transition to a Low Carbon Britain mean for the future development of cities and regions across the country? Does it reinforce existing ‘business as usual’ or create new transformational opportunities? Low Carbon Nation? takes an interdisciplinary approach to tackle this critical question, by looking across the different dimensions of technological, scientific, social and economic change within the diverse city and regional contexts of the UK…