Citizens’ perceptions of justice in international climate policy : empirical insights from China, Germany and the US

Citizens’ perceptions of justice in international climate policy : empirical insights from China, Germany and the US / Joachim Schleich, Elisabeth Dütschke, Claudia Schwirplies, Andreas Ziegler. Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research, 2014, 35 p.

http://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/fisisi/s22014.html

Authors’s abstract :

Relying on a recent survey of more than 3300 participants from China, Germany and the US, this paper empirically analyzes citizens’ perceptions of climate change and climate policy, focusing on key guiding principles for sharing mitigation costs across countries. The ranking of the main principles for burden-sharing is identical in China, Germany and the US: accountability followed by capability, egalitarianism, and sovereignty. Thus, on a general level, citizens across these countries seem to have a common understanding of fairness. We therefore find no evidence that citizens’ (stated) fairness preferences are detri-mental to future burden-sharing agreements. While there is heterogeneity in citizens’ perceptions of climate change and climate policy within and across countries, a substantial portion of citizens in all countries perceive a lack of transparency, fairness, and trust in international climate agreements.



Citer ce billet
Danièle Revel (2014, 28 février). Citizens’ perceptions of justice in international climate policy : empirical insights from China, Germany and the US. Veille énergie climat. Consulté le 24 avril 2024, à l’adresse https://doi.org/10.58079/oaw8

Vous aimerez aussi...

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search