Étiqueté : carbon capture and storage

Social acceptance and optimal pollution: CCS or tax?

The two main hurdles to a widespread carbon capture and storage (CCS) deployment are: cost and social acceptance issues. Assessing accurately social preferences is thus interesting to determine whether CCS is socially optimal. Unlike most academic papers that have a dichotomous approach and consider either the atmospheric pollution (first source of marginal disutility) or the underground pollution (second source), we consider the problem as a whole: CCS techniques introduce a third source of disutility due to the simultaneous presence of CO2 in the atmosphere and in geological formations…

Research or carbon capture and storage – How to limit climate change?

The consequences of the 2°C climate target and the implicitly imposed ceiling on CO2 have been analyzed in several studies. We use an endogenous growth model with a ceiling and a carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology to study the effect of the ceiling on the allocation of limited funds for R&D, CCS and capital accumulation…

Potential and limitations of bioenergy options for low carbon transitions

Sustaining low CO2 emission pathways to 2100 may rely on electricity production from biomass. The authors analyze the effect of the availability of biomass resources and technologies with and without carbon capture and storage within a general equilibrium framework. Biomass technologies are introduced into the electricity module of the hybrid general equilibrium model Imaclim-R…

Carbon sequestration, economic policies and growth

The possibility of capturing and sequestering some fraction of the CO2 emissions arising from fossil fuel combustion, often labeled as carbon capture and storage, is drawing an increasing amount of attention in the business and academic communities. The authors present here a model of endogenous growth in which the use of a non-renewable resource in production yields ‡ows of pollution whose accumulated stock negatively affects welfare…

Tracking progress in Carbon Capture and Storage

The report considers a number of key questions. Taken as a whole, what advancements have committed CCUS AG governments made against the 2011 recommendations since CEM 2? How can Energy Ministers continue to drive progress to enable CCS to fully contribute to climate change mitigation? While urgent further action is required in all areas, are there particular areas that are currently receiving less policy attention than others, where efforts could be redoubled?