Étiqueté : poverty

Incrementum ad Absurdum: Global Growth, Inequality and Poverty Eradication in a Carbon-Constrained World

The paper seeks to assess the timeframe for eradication of poverty, defined by poverty lines of $1.25 and $5 per person per day at 2005 purchasing power parity, if pre-crisis (1993-2008) patterns of income growth were maintained indefinitely, taking account of the differential performance of China…

Confronting the curse: The economics and geopolitics of natural resource governance

Countries blessed with abundant natural resources often seek financial and political power from their supposedly lucky status. But the potentially negative impact of natural resources on development of poor countries is captured in the phrase « the resource curse. » Instead of success and prosperity, producers of gold, oil, rubber, sugar, and other commodities—many in the least developed parts of Africa and Asia—often remain mired in poverty and plagued by economic mismanagement, political authoritarianism, foreign exploitation, and violent conflict….

Escaping the vicious cycle of poverty: towards universal access to energy

While fossil fuels will inevitably play a major role in expanding on-grid energy supply, this CEPS’s study shows that renewable energy sources – and especially small decentralised solutions – have huge potential for providing reliable, sustainable and affordable energy services for the poor, particularly in rural areas of developing countries

Towards an « energy plus » approach for the poor

A new analysis from the United Nations Development Programme, based on case studies from across Asia and the Pacific, calls for a set of “energy plus” services – one that combines access to modern energy for heating, cooking and electricity, with measures that generate cash, supplement incomes and improve health and education.

Measuring the benefits of increased electricity access in developing countries

The objective of this ESMAP’s paper is to shed some light on the benefits of improved access to electricity supply, specifically the benefits referred to as, ‘consumer’s surplus’, which is the difference between what customers are willing to pay for the utilities associated with electricity access and the price that they actually pay.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search